Categories:


Archives:


Links:

  • Laura Hudson's Myriad Issues
  • Brill Building
  • The Comics Reporter
  • The Newsarama Blog
  • The Beat
  • Comics Should be Good
  • Comic Feed
  • Chris Arrant
  • Comics Waiting Room
  • Dave's Long Box
  • Neilalien
  • Love Manga
  • Progressive Ruin
  • Comics Worth Reading
  • BeaucoupKevin
  • Riot
  • LeftyBrown's Corner
  • Comics Ate My Brain
  • Mark Evanier's News From Me
  • So So Silver Age
  • A David Lewis


  • Meta:

    We couldn’t fit it in the issue: Short Review of Hopey Glass

    hopey.jpg

    THE EDUCATION OF HOPEY GLASS
    , Fantagraphics
    By Jaime Hernandez
    Review by Jason Michelitch

    In the case for Jaime Hernandez as one of America’s great cartoonists, the “Locas” series of short stories and novellas is Exhibit A. Although some dismiss Hernandez, with his bold lines and impeccable compositions, as merely a superior draftsman, his true keys to the pantheon lie in the strength of his characters and the powerful economy of his storytelling.

    In the titular story from the latest “Locas” collection, THE EDUCATION OF HOPEY GLASS, one of Hernandez’s most popular characters, Hopey, comes face to face with the end of her youth as she transitions careers from bartender to kindergarten teacher. The second half of the book tracks the strained relationship of a loser named Rick and an aspiring actress named Vivian amidst weirdoes, exes, and murderers. Their’s is a pulpier, more noirish story than Hopey’s slice-of-life tale, but one of Hernandez’s strengths is in keeping all the “Locas” stories peripherally connected, but independently readable.

    Hernandez’s visual pacing makes the storytelling anything but static, and in a world of “artcomix” dominated by disaffection and despair, Hernandez’s characters are refreshingly joyful and alive; even their lowest moments seem animated rather than weighed down. The entire book is infused with the hallmark of any Jaime Hernandez work: pure, believable humanity.

    Posted by Tim Leong on March 31st, 2008 filed in Reviews, Blog |

    Comments are closed.